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The Secrets Behind Dean 6 String Banjo Serial Numbers



Dean 6 String Banjo Serial Number Decoder




If you are a guitar player who loves the sound of a banjo, you might be interested in the Dean 6 String Banjo. This is a hybrid instrument that combines the features of a guitar and a banjo, making it easy to play and versatile. But how can you tell when and where your Dean 6 String Banjo was made? And what does the serial number on the back of the headstock mean? In this article, we will explain how to decode the Dean 6 String Banjo serial number and learn more about your instrument.




dean 6 string banjo serial number decoder


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What is a Dean 6 String Banjo?




A Dean 6 String Banjo is a type of banjo that has six strings instead of the usual four or five. It is tuned like a guitar, so you don't need to learn a new tuning system to play it. It also has a familiar guitar neck and fretboard, so you can use the same chords and scales as on a guitar. However, it has a banjo body and an 11-inch Remo head, which gives it the distinctive banjo tone and resonance.


Dean Guitars is a company that specializes in making electric guitars, acoustic guitars, bass guitars, and other instruments. They started making banjos in the late 1970s, and they introduced the Backwoods 6 Banjo model in 2009. This model is one of the most popular Dean 6 String Banjos, and it comes in different finishes and colors. You can find more information about this model on their website.


How to Decode the Dean 6 String Banjo Serial Number?




The serial number of your Dean 6 String Banjo can tell you some important information about your instrument, such as when and where it was made. However, not all serial numbers are the same, and they can vary depending on the year and the location of production.


Generally speaking, Dean Guitars manufactured in the USA will have a seven digit serial number on the back of the headstock . The first two digits represent the year and the remaining digits typically represent the production number, although this is not consistent. For example, if your serial number is 1203456, it means that your banjo was made in 2012 and it was the 3456th instrument produced that year.


However, there is an exception to this rule. From 1986 to 1996, Dean Guitars was owned by Tropical Music, who changed the serial number system. During this period, the serial numbers were printed on the last fret instead of the headstock, and they had no meaning or pattern. So if you find your serial number on the last fret, you can only tell that your banjo was made between 1986 and 1996, but nothing else.


Another thing to consider is that not all Dean Guitars are made in the USA. Some models are made in other countries, such as Korea, China, Indonesia, or India. These models usually have different serial number formats that vary depending on the factory and the year. Some examples are:


  • Korean-made models have an eight digit serial number that starts with S or C followed by seven numbers. The first number after S or C represents the year within each decade (for example, S9 means 2009 or 2019), and the second number represents the month (for example, S905 means May). The remaining five numbers are the production number.



  • Chinese-made models have an eight digit serial number that starts with Y followed by seven numbers. The first two numbers after Y represent the year (for example, Y12 means 2012), and the next two numbers represent the month (for example, Y1205 means May). The remaining four numbers are the production number.



  • Indonesian-made models have an eight digit serial number that starts with I followed by seven numbers. The first two numbers after I represent the year (for example, I12 means 2012), and the next two numbers represent the month (for example, I1205 means May). The remaining four numbers are the production number.



  • Indian-made models have an eight digit serial number that starts with SI followed by six numbers. The first two numbers after SI represent the year (for example, SI12 means 2012), and the next two numbers represent the month (for example, SI1205 means May). The remaining four numbers are unknown.



To find out where your banjo was made, you can look for other clues on your instrument, such as labels, stickers, logos, or stamps. You can also compare your banjo with other models online or contact Dean Guitars customer service for more information.


What are the Benefits of a Dean 6 String Banjo?




A Dean 6 String Banjo can offer you some benefits that a regular banjo or a guitar cannot. Some of these benefits are:


  • It is easy to play for guitarists. If you already know how to play a guitar, you don't need to learn a new instrument to play a Dean 6 String Banjo. You can use the same chords, scales, and techniques as on a guitar, and you don't need to worry about fingerpicking or clawhammer styles that are common on a regular banjo.



  • It is versatile and adaptable. A Dean 6 String Banjo can produce a variety of sounds and tones depending on how you play it and where you place the pickup. You can play it acoustically or plug it into an amp or a PA system. You can also use different effects pedals or processors to create different sounds. You can play it in different genres and styles, such as bluegrass, folk, country, rock, metal, or even jazz.



  • It is fun and unique. A Dean 6 String Banjo can add some spice and flavor to your music and your performance. It can attract attention and curiosity from your audience and your fellow musicians. It can also challenge you to explore new musical possibilities and express yourself creatively.



What are the Drawbacks of a Dean 6 String Banjo?




Of course, a Dean 6 String Banjo is not perfect, and it has some drawbacks that you should be aware of before buying one. Some of these drawbacks are:


  • It is not a true banjo. A Dean 6 String Banjo may look like a banjo and sound like a banjo, but it is not a banjo. It is a guitar with a banjo body and head. It does not have the same feel, tone, or resonance as a real banjo. It also does not have the same tuning system or playing style as a real banjo. If you want to learn how to play a real banjo, you should get a real banjo.



  • It requires some setup and maintenance. A Dean 6 String Banjo is not a plug-and-play instrument. It needs some adjustments and tweaks to make it sound good and play well. You may need to tighten the head, adjust the bridge, change the strings, relocate the pickup, or sand the frets. You may also need to use a powered direct box or an amp with a compensating input to make the pickup work properly. You may also need to clean and polish the instrument regularly to keep it in good shape.



  • It may not suit everyone's taste or preference. A Dean 6 String Banjo is not for everyone. Some people may find it too loud, too heavy, too flashy, or too gimmicky. Some people may prefer the traditional sound and feel of a regular banjo or a guitar. Some people may also think that it is cheating or disrespectful to play a hybrid instrument instead of a real one.



How to Tune a Dean 6 String Banjo?




One of the advantages of a Dean 6 String Banjo is that it is tuned like a guitar, so you don't need to learn a new tuning system to play it. However, you still need to know how to tune your banjo properly to make it sound good and avoid damaging it. There are different methods and tools that you can use to tune your banjo, such as:


  • A tuner. A tuner is a device that can detect the pitch of your strings and tell you if they are too high or too low. You can use an electronic tuner, a clip-on tuner, a smartphone app, or a website to tune your banjo. To use a tuner, you simply pluck each string and adjust the tuning pegs until the tuner shows that the string is in tune with the desired note.



  • A pitch pipe. A pitch pipe is a small device that can produce the sound of different notes. You can use a pitch pipe to tune your banjo by ear. To use a pitch pipe, you blow into the hole that corresponds to the note that you want to tune your string to. Then you pluck the string and adjust the tuning pegs until the string sounds the same as the pitch pipe.



  • A piano or another instrument. You can also use a piano or another instrument that is in tune to tune your banjo by ear. To use this method, you play the note that you want to tune your string to on the piano or the other instrument. Then you pluck the string and adjust the tuning pegs until the string sounds the same as the piano or the other instrument.



As mentioned earlier, a Dean 6 String Banjo is usually tuned to an open G tuning, which means that the strings are tuned to G, C, G, G, B, and D notes from low to high. However, you can also experiment with different tunings to create different sounds and effects. Some examples of alternative tunings are:


  • Open D tuning. This tuning is achieved by tuning the strings to D, A, D, F#, A, and D notes from low to high. This tuning is popular for playing blues and slide guitar.



  • Drop C tuning. This tuning is achieved by tuning the strings to C, G, C, G, B, and D notes from low to high. This tuning is popular for playing metal and rock music.



  • Standard E tuning. This tuning is achieved by tuning the strings to E, A, D, G, B, and E notes from low to high. This tuning is the same as a regular guitar tuning and can be used for playing any genre of music.



What is the History of the Dean 6 String Banjo?




The Dean 6 String Banjo is a relatively new invention that combines the features of a guitar and a banjo. It is not clear who invented the first 6 string banjo, but some sources suggest that it was developed in the late 19th or early 20th century by musicians who wanted to play banjo music on a guitar-like instrument. However, the 6 string banjo did not become popular until the 1960s and 1970s, when artists such as Bob Dylan, Neil Young, and The Eagles used it in their songs.


Dean Guitars is a company that was founded in 1976 by Dean Zelinsky, a young guitar maker who wanted to create innovative and high-quality instruments. Dean Guitars became famous for making electric guitars with distinctive shapes, such as the ML, the V, and the Z. Dean Guitars also made acoustic guitars, bass guitars, and other instruments, including banjos.


Dean Guitars started making banjos in the late 1970s, and they introduced the Backwoods 6 Banjo model in 2009. This model is one of the most popular Dean 6 String Banjos, and it comes in different finishes and colors. It has a nyatoh body and neck, a Remo head, a DMT design humbucker pickup, and a chrome hardware. It is tuned like a guitar, so it is easy to play for guitarists who want to add new sounds to their music.


Conclusion




A Dean 6 String Banjo is a hybrid instrument that combines the features of a guitar and a banjo. It is tuned like a guitar, so it is easy to play for guitarists who want to add new sounds to their music. It also has a banjo body and head, which gives it the distinctive banjo tone and resonance. A Dean 6 String Banjo can offer some benefits, such as versatility, adaptability, and uniqueness, but it also has some drawbacks, such as not being a true banjo, requiring some setup and maintenance, and not suiting everyone's taste or preference.


In this article, we have explained how to decode the Dean 6 String Banjo serial number and learn more about your instrument. We have also discussed how to tune your banjo, and what are the best accessories for your banjo. We have also given you some background information about the history of the Dean 6 String Banjo and the Dean Guitars company. We hope that this article has been helpful and informative for you. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to contact us. Thank you for reading! a27c54c0b2


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